Quick Tip: Microsoft Word: Creating an Index

When you want to create an index, it can look like a daunting task. The sheer amount of text you have to type, page numbers you have to track down, references you have to include, and then if your page numbers change… With Word’s reference function, it’s actually pretty simple – all you have to do is mark the places where you want an entry. In this quick tip, I’ll help you learn how to mark entries in your index, and then create the index itself.

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Quick Tip: Microsoft Word: Table of Contents

A table of contents is a must in any relatively long document, whether it’s a proposal, a book, or anything that has a lot of sections. Thankfully, you don’t have to manually enter these sections, format the spacing or update the page numbers on your own. In this quick tip, I’ll show you how you can use Word to not only populate a table of contents, but also update it with little more than the click of a mouse.

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Quick Tip: Microsoft Word: Keep With Next

Every once in a while, it seems like no matter what you do, formatting isn’t getting you the results you want in your document. Sure, breaks can separate one section from another – but how do you make lines stay together? The keep with next function is Word’s way of allowing you to keep the important things on the same page, even if you change formatting or add breaks, and I’ll show you how to find and use it in this quick tip.

See more quick tips here: Quick Tips for Microsoft Office Applications.

Quick Tip: Microsoft Word: Breaks

When you want to control how a document looks, using breaks is a helpful way to start. By separating your document, you can keep headers from getting stuck at the end of a page, and even change the formatting one section to another without having to manually select and format them. In this quick tip, I’ll show you how to use breaks to split your document into sections, whether you just need to start something on a new page or have to overhaul the whole document.

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Quick Tip: Microsoft Word: Keyboard Movement and Selection

Keyboard shortcuts are a well-known way to reduce the amount of times you move your hand from your keyboard to your mouse and vice-versa when you’re editing your document. However, there are ways to navigate your document and even select text using just your keyboard as well. I’ll show you in this quick tip how to reduce the number of times you reach for your mouse when you want to select text or move around your document.

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Quick Tip: Microsoft Word: Quick Parts

If you’re working in a collaborative space, such as a SharePoint library app, you’ll often use certain fields or metadata to contain important information. Microsoft Word can capture this information, and even change it. In this quick tip, I’ll show you how you can use quick parts to update some of the document’s properties, which can then be populated to a collaborative space.

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Quick Tip: Microsoft Word: Record a Macro

Sometimes you need the same piece of text used multiple times over tons of different documents. It could be a short piece of text, like a slogan or trademark, or a longer paragraph. In Word, you can create, or record, a macro, as I’ll show you in this quick tip, and use that macro in all sorts of documents, removing the need to copy and paste from one document to the next.

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Quick Tip: Microsoft Word: Turn on the Developer Tab

The Ribbon is a staple of Microsoft Word, allowing you to use a plethora of commands with the click of a mouse, from the widely-used Home tab to the Review and Mailings tabs. Every once in a while, there comes a time when you need to use a tool or do a task that isn’t at hand by default. I’ll show you how to turn on the Developer tab in this quick tip, so you have easy access to even more commands in Word.

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Quick Tip: Microsoft Word: Paragraph Markers

When drafting a formal document, formatting is often a key challenge. Maybe your organization always uses two spaces after a sentence instead of one, or you’re not sure why a table looks the way it does. In this quick tip, I’ll show you how to turn on the paragraph markers so you can see how Word is formatting a document.

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Quick Tip: Microsoft Word: Styles

Whether you’re writing a book, an opinion article, or even a grant proposal, you want your document to look professional. When you have different headers and sub-headers, sections and lists, it can get tricky stay consistent – did you use 24 pt font, or 28 for that header, and why is there a random indent in that paragraph? In this quick tip, I’ll show you how to use Word’s built-in styles, making it easier to navigate your document and helping your text look clean and professional.

See more quick tips here: Quick Tips for Microsoft Office Applications.