Reenabling Home Page / Web Page Views for Outlook Folders

One of my favorite tricks for making it easier for folks to use SharePoint is to set the view of a folder in Microsoft Outlook to a page so that users see the page instead of the contents of the folder. This creates a quick link inside of Outlook to SharePoint. However, the October 2017 updates broke this functionality. See Outlook Home Page feature is missing in folder properties for more on what they changed and why. Fortunately, the blog post has a way to reenable the functionality. I’ve put together a quick .reg file that you can run to get the functionality back. It’s in this ZIP file. You’ll have to extract it and double-click it. The standard legal disclaimers apply.

Once you’ve run the file you can right-click a folder, from the menu that appears select properties, then select the Home Page tab. On the Home Page tab, you can click the ‘Show home page by default for this folder’ and enter the URL of the site that you want to have displayed when you select the folder. Finally, click OK.

In this case, I’ve got my Saved Mail folder set to open the SharePoint Search site for my Office 365 tenant.

Quick Tip: Word: References

Quick Tip: Microsoft Word: References

In academic or research documents, you have to cite your sources, both in text as well as in a bibliography. Though you could write out your sources manually, and even hunt down the proper citation for the required style (such as MLA or APA), Word has some tools to make this easy. I’ll show you how you can use Word to insert in-text citations, add new sources, create a bibliography of those sources, and even change the citation style for all of your references in this quick tip.

See more quick tips here: Quick Tips for Microsoft Office Applications.

Quick Tip: Word: Creating an Index

Quick Tip: Microsoft Word: Creating an Index

When you want to create an index, it can look like a daunting task. The sheer amount of text you have to type, page numbers you have to track down, references you have to include, and then if your page numbers change… With Word’s reference function, it’s actually pretty simple – all you have to do is mark the places where you want an entry. In this quick tip, I’ll help you learn how to mark entries in your index, and then create the index itself.

See more quick tips here: Quick Tips for Microsoft Office Applications.

Quick Tip: Word: Table of Contents

Quick Tip: Microsoft Word: Table of Contents

A table of contents is a must in any relatively long document, whether it’s a proposal, a book, or anything that has a lot of sections. Thankfully, you don’t have to manually enter these sections, format the spacing or update the page numbers on your own. In this quick tip, I’ll show you how you can use Word to not only populate a table of contents, but also update it with little more than the click of a mouse.

See more quick tips here: Quick Tips for Microsoft Office Applications.

Quick Tip: Word: Keep with Next

Quick Tip: Microsoft Word: Keep With Next

Every once in a while, it seems like no matter what you do, formatting isn’t getting you the results you want in your document. Sure, breaks can separate one section from another – but how do you make lines stay together? The keep with next function is Word’s way of allowing you to keep the important things on the same page, even if you change formatting or add breaks, and I’ll show you how to find and use it in this quick tip.

See more quick tips here: Quick Tips for Microsoft Office Applications.

Quick Tip: Word: Breaks

Quick Tip: Microsoft Word: Breaks

When you want to control how a document looks, using breaks is a helpful way to start. By separating your document, you can keep headers from getting stuck at the end of a page, and even change the formatting one section to another without having to manually select and format them. In this quick tip, I’ll show you how to use breaks to split your document into sections, whether you just need to start something on a new page or have to overhaul the whole document.

See more quick tips here: Quick Tips for Microsoft Office Applications.

Quick Tip: Word: Keyboard Movement and Selection

Quick Tip: Microsoft Word: Keyboard Movement and Selection

Keyboard shortcuts are a well-known way to reduce the amount of times you move your hand from your keyboard to your mouse and vice-versa when you’re editing your document. However, there are ways to navigate your document and even select text using just your keyboard as well. I’ll show you in this quick tip how to reduce the number of times you reach for your mouse when you want to select text or move around your document.

See more quick tips here: Quick Tips for Microsoft Office Applications.

Quick Tip: Word: Quick Parts

Quick Tip: Microsoft Word: Quick Parts

If you’re working in a collaborative space, such as a SharePoint library app, you’ll often use certain fields or metadata to contain important information. Microsoft Word can capture this information, and even change it. In this quick tip, I’ll show you how you can use quick parts to update some of the document’s properties, which can then be populated to a collaborative space.

See more quick tips here: Quick Tips for Microsoft Office Applications.

Quick Tip: Word: Record a Macro

Quick Tip: Microsoft Word: Record a Macro

Sometimes you need the same piece of text used multiple times over tons of different documents. It could be a short piece of text, like a slogan or trademark, or a longer paragraph. In Word, you can create, or record, a macro, as I’ll show you in this quick tip, and use that macro in all sorts of documents, removing the need to copy and paste from one document to the next.

See more quick tips here: Quick Tips for Microsoft Office Applications.

Quick Tip: Word: Turn on the Developer Tab

Quick Tip: Microsoft Word: Turn on the Developer Tab

The Ribbon is a staple of Microsoft Word, allowing you to use a plethora of commands with the click of a mouse, from the widely-used Home tab to the Review and Mailings tabs. Every once in a while, there comes a time when you need to use a tool or do a task that isn’t at hand by default. I’ll show you how to turn on the Developer tab in this quick tip, so you have easy access to even more commands in Word.

See more quick tips here: Quick Tips for Microsoft Office Applications.