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Article: 5 Steps to Take after a SharePoint Debacle

A fresh start means a clean stop, a frank assessment, and a good deal of recalibration before you try moving forward again.

The train is off the tracks. Your users hate SharePoint, and they refuse to use it. You know the organization needs an intranet and a collaboration platform, but how do you get back on track and rolling again? Here are five steps for getting to your goal.

1. Stop

Help Your SharePoint User

It’s really difficult to evaluate a situation as it’s changing and as more energy is being poured into it. If the train is off the tracks and skidding on its side, stop the engines and let it come to a screeching halt. Once the train is back on the tracks, you can get it moving again—in the right direction.

2. Honest assessment 

Step 4 of a 12-step program is making a “fearless and searching moral inventory.” Openly assessing what went wrong in your SharePoint implementation won’t be gut-wrenching, but it’s likely to hurt. The politics of the situation—with everyone wanting to “save face”—won’t make it easy, but openly assessing the problems is essential.

1 reply
  1. Annie
    Annie says:

    I also shared this with Robert, but I believe that if you openly admit to a client that your sharepoint implementation has failed, most will respect your honesty and integrity. You can then move forward with the project from there, at least that’s the optimistic scenario!

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